November 28, 2021

Beyond Going Long

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Most Austrians believe that Kurz’s suspicions can be based on the truth

Kurz, who became a member of the National Assembly and head of the Austrian Freedom Party’s parliamentary group this week, is currently the subject of two investigations.

Two-thirds of Austrians believe there is some truth to the corruption allegations being investigated by former Chancellor Sebastian Kurz’s Office of the Anti-Corruption Prosecutor’s Office (WKStA). This is according to a survey conducted by Unique Research for the magazine’s profile, APA reported on Saturday.

The view that the accusations against Austrian People’s Party (ÖVP) leader Kurz can be true is that of the majority of Austrians – up to 67 percent. Only 23 percent of respondents believe that there is nothing true about the allegations. The survey, which was conducted over the phone and the Internet, included 800 people, with a statistical deviation of 3.5%.

If Austria’s parliamentary elections were held on Sunday, Kurz’s ÖVP would receive only 25 per cent support, a 10 per cent drop. Thus, the People’s Party will receive the same number of votes as the opposition Social Democratic Party of Austria (SPÖ), which, according to the survey, has improved by four percent. Support for the Green Party will also rise slightly to 14 percent, or 2 percent. The Free Austria (FPÖ) party won with 19 per cent and the liberal Neuss party with 11 per cent with the same number of votes.

Only 16 per cent of people would vote for the new chancellor of Alexander Schallenberg if the head of government were elected directly. If the course were to run for the position again, 20 percent of respondents would vote for it (eight percent less than last month).

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wrong sentence

Kurz, who became a member of the National Assembly and head of the Austrian Freedom Party’s parliamentary group this week, is currently the subject of two investigations. The first concerns the suspicion of perjury before a parliamentary committee investigating the 2019 Ibiza case, which led to the collapse of his government with the right-wing Freedom Party.

The second relates to the fact that Kurz and a circle of people close to him used resources from the Ministry of Finance to secure positive news in the media and embellished public opinion polls in favor of the ÖVP before the parliamentary elections in 2017.

In this context, the WKStA investigated a total of ten people on suspicion of embezzlement and bribery. The course itself denies these allegations.