September 19, 2021

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Britain imposes new sanctions on Belarus

Britain imposes new sanctions on Belarus

London, August 9 (TASR) – The United Kingdom on Monday approved new sanctions on Belarus. Sanctions, among other things, prohibit the export of petroleum products and potash to Belarus. Britain accepted them in an attempt to put pressure on the regime of Belarusian leader Alexander Lukashenko, who delivered to London suffocated by new sanctions, Reuters news.

Reuters reports that Western sanctions have not helped Lukashenko change his political course and end his repression against his opponents.

Recent British bans prohibit the sale of convertible securities and financial market instruments issued by the State Bank of Belarus and its state banks.

On Monday, marking the first anniversary of the controversial presidential election in Belarus, the White House confirmed that the United States was preparing to announce new sanctions. The European Union threatened new sanctions on Minsk over the weekend.

The new British sanctions include a ban on Belarusian Airlines’ excessive flights and landings in the UK, as well as a ban on providing technical assistance to Lukashenko’s luxury air fleet. “These sanctions prove that the UK does not approve of Lukashenko’s actions after fraudulent elections“British Foreign Secretary Dominic Robb said.”The Lukashenko regime is destroying democracy and violating human rights, ”The minister added.

Lukashenko has pointed to the brink of new sanctions to stifle Britain. “You obedient dogs of America,“Added.

The Belarusian state-owned company Belaruskali is a global potash producer and accounts for about 20 percent of global trade in this product.

After last year’s election, Belarus plunged into a wave of opposition, which provoked Lukashenko’s re-election. Belarusian authorities have responded to the protests with repression and arrests. Leading opposition figures have been imprisoned or forced to flee the country.

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